Arrow backLanguage
EN
Article

Your Baby’s Movement During Pregnancy

Fetal Movement: Feeling Your Baby Kick!

2 mins
to read Apr 1, 2021

A mother will probably start to feel her baby moving inside her womb between 16 and 24 weeks of pregnancy, and should continue to feel it right up to the time she goes into labor.

 

A baby’s movement can be anything from a kick, a flutter, a swish or a roll. It may change in pattern and frequency as pregnancy progresses.

 

If you’re wondering if there’s a standard set number of movements you should be feeling as of the second trimester of pregnancy, be sure that there’s no such a thing.

Every baby is unique and so is your baby; he has his own pattern of movements that you need to know to be able to monitor him and make sure he’s ok.

After all, fetal movements are not meaningless; they are actual signs that baby in the womb is healthy and doing just fine.

So, whenever you feel a change or a slowdown in your child’s movement pattern let your doctor know right away; perhaps your baby has a problem and needs a medical

intervention.

If you think that your baby is supposed to move less towards the end of pregnancy, you’re so wrong. He actually, should move more and more through 32 weeks, and then stay quite the same up until you go into labor and give birth.

 

So, keep an eye on your baby, especially at quiet times, for most active fetal movements occur in the evening, while lying on the bed or sitting in a bathtub, maybe because you’d be more relaxed at these times!

 

Read More: Can Heartbeat Predict A Baby’s Gender?

Logo white

Get full access to expert-backed nutrition support

  • My feed

    Curated content based on your preferences 

  • Feeding guidance

    Learn about various feeding options and what each means for you and your baby

  • Tailored Practical Tools

    Try our tailored practical tools to guide you through the parenting journey.

  • My First 1000 Days club

    Customised notifications, reminders and newsletters

Search icon

Still haven't found what you are looking for?

Try our new smart question engine. We'll always have something for you.